Death Of Robin Williams Stuns Leader Of Fairfield County Theater

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Lou Ursone, executive director at Stamford's Curtain Call, said he was shocked by Robin Williams' suicide Monday.
Lou Ursone, executive director at Stamford's Curtain Call, said he was shocked by Robin Williams' suicide Monday. Photo Credit: Frak MacEachern

STAMFORD, Conn., -- The suicide of comedic genius Robin Williams stunned the world and a leader in the Stamford performing arts scene.

"I'm shocked. It's hard to believe," said Lou Ursone, Curtain Call executive director.

Williams, the star of "Mrs. Doubtfire," "Good Will Hunting" and "Dead Poets Society" as well as the television series that rocketed him to fame, "Mork & Mindy," hanged himself with a belt Monday, police said. 

Ursone said it was hard to decide which performance was Williams' best - especially because his live impromptu appearances were often extraordinary works of art as well.

"His 'Inside the Actors Studio' session is legendary," Ursone said. "That unbelievable boundless energy is unparalleled. Literally there is no one else like him."

He said Williams was unique among actors and comedians.

"I don't think anyone, that I can think of, that had that boundless kinetic , frenetic brilliance," Ursone said.

Among the many spectacular movies that Williams made, Ursone said "Dead Poets Society" is his favorite, although he said "Good Morning, Vietnam" was notable because it combined Williams' frenetic, high-energy comedic style with serious acting.

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As Technical Director at the Los Angeles Improv in the 70's it was always easy to bring up sound and lights for one of Robin's midnight sets. Lasting on many occasions until 2am.
What was difficult was bringing them down.